The Coronation Ceremony

This #Write31Days post is one in a series about the Kansas City Renaissance Festival.  You can find the rest of the series here.

There is a tradition within the Festival that I was not aware of the reason until this year, and that is the Coronation Ceremony.

It would be silly to assume that the same people play the king and the queen every single year, and yet, I must have.  But way back at the very first recruiting party I went to, the Maestro (the director) of the festival introduced the new king for the year.

Scott is playing King Henry VIII this year and is doing a fabulous job with the role.

King Henry VIII - photo by Mark Lever

King Henry VIII – photo by Mark Lever

But because he is a “new” king, he had to have a coronation ceremony, of course.

Enter the drama.  Do you know how hard it is to find a Gothic-esque type church in Kansas City?  Last minute?  For free?

We finally were able to use the Scottish Rite Temple downtown, and it turned out fabulous.

What follows are pictures that I took during our rehearsal times, mainly because we aren’t allowed to have our phones on us when we are in character.  They aren’t period appropriate.  😉

Lady Mary Boleyn and Princess Mary Tudor

Lady Mary Boleyn and Princess Mary Tudor

The Fairy Godmother lowering the veil between seen and unseen

The Fairy Godmother lowering the veil between seen and unseen

Rowena the Brownie greeting the court of the Fae

Rowena the Brownie greeting the court of the Fae

The

The “wicked” stepmother for the event.

The scenario this year is Cinderella.  We have two stepsisters, but no stepmother.  This lady is part of the fair, but she was moving.  Maestro invited her to be part of the coronation ceremony as a sort of a last huzzah.

A fight between the two stepsisters.

A fight between the two stepsisters.

A yeoman. A guard for the queen.

A yeoman. A guard for the queen.

My sister and one of the stage managers

My sister and one of the stage managers

You tend to get a bit slap happy or punch drunk after a certain number of rehearsal hours.  Thus, “fighting” ensues.  (They are really just playing.)

The queen and her maid getting ready to enter

The queen and her maid getting ready to enter

The entrance of the King

The entrance of the King

Waiting patiently. Admiring her King.

Waiting patiently.

Time for the crowning of the king and queen!

Time for the crowning of the king and queen!

After the ceremony, which was everything I imagined, we had a reception.  Which had it’s own drama.

Do you know that it takes more than 2 days to make enough cake for 300 people?  So what do you do when your caterer backs out last minute?  Send out the word.

And end up with enough cake for 350 people.  I personally baked 6 rounds.

But you also get to have a party at the reception, which for the Renaissance Festival includes dancing and singing.  It also happened to be the first time the my sisters and I got to sing together in public.

Coronation Reception

Coronation Reception 2

Oh!  I almost forgot two of my favorite pictures from that day.

Behind stage waiting to enter. I LOVE this picture of me.

Behind stage waiting to enter. I LOVE this picture of me.

Leaving the ceremony for the reception

Leaving the ceremony for the reception

And of course, the one I have been using in my header is from that day.

Coronation entrance

The coronation was beautiful.  The king and the queen are wonderful people, and I am glad I had the opportunity to celebrate with them.

Hugs,
Melinda

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6 thoughts on “The Coronation Ceremony

  1. These posts are so fun! I found you via the 31 Dayers fb group. So, do you get paid for being in the Ren Faire? And how have you found the time to participate since you have kids? (I think you mentioned that?) Looks like fun!

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